DLNA Adds New Features to Its Interoperability Guidelines for 2009


dlna logoMore news from the DLNA today. First, we heard that MoCA became an approved networking standard (as well as 802.11n) for future DLNA certified products. Now, the Digital Living Network Alliance is announcing new features like improved photo, video, audio synchronization, WPA2 support for wireless security, “Play To” & “Print To” functionality for sending media files to from one DLNA connected devices to another via a new device type called a “Digital Media Controller”, and lastly Menu Sharing “allowing menu control of other network devices.” Unfortunately, the attached press releases below don’t go into much detail into how exactly the Digital Media Controller and Media Sharing work, but I’m guessing we’ll be seeing a preview next month at CES 2009.

Related: Must See: Windows 7 “Play To” in Action (1/23/09)

DLNA Enhances Home Network Experience with New Ways To Find, Share and Enjoy Content

802.11n and MoCA® Connectivity Options, Wi-Fi Protected SetupTM Support, Content Synchronization and Menu Sharing Added to Interoperability Guidelines

Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) has introduced additional connectivity options, protected setup support, content synchronization and menu sharing that enhance the entertainment possibilities for home network users.

New additions to DLNA Interoperability Guidelines, currently available to members with publication in early 2009, provide additional flexibility for users to send, receive and enjoy content where they want it, when they want it.

Built on a foundation of technical work completed by the 240 member companies of DLNA, these Guideline additions offer:

Photo, Video and Audio Synchronization providing automated synchronization of content across multiple devices. Menu Sharing allowing menu control of other networked devices. Wi-Fi Protected Setup making it easy for users to configure and add devices to a home Wi-Fi network protected with WPA2 security.

Inclusion of 802.11n and MoCA® connectivity standards in the Guidelines reinforce DLNA’s commitment to work with other industry standard groups.

“DLNA is the solution for the connected home,” says Scott Smyers, chairman of the DLNA board of directors and senior vice president of Sony. “Service providers and manufacturers who adopt the guidelines are meeting the needs of consumers to share and enjoy content anytime, anywhere.”

“Including Wi-Fi Protected Setup in the Guidelines reflects DLNA’s commitment to a great user experience,” says Edgar Figueroa, executive director of the Wi-Fi Alliance. “Now, Wi-Fi-enabled DLNA devices will be even easier to configure, and the latest generation of Wi-Fi security will be enabled across the networked home.”

About DLNA
Members of Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) share a vision of an interoperable network of personal computers (PC), consumer electronics (CE), mobile devices and service providers in and beyond the home, enabling a seamless environment for sharing and growing new digital media and content services. Founded in 2003, the group established and maintains a platform of interoperability based on open and established industry standards that, when used by manufacturers will support the sharing of media through wired or wireless networks. More than 240 multi-industry companies from around the world have joined DLNA, committing the time and resources necessary to achieve their vision. DLNA’s 2009 Promoter Members include: Access, Awox, Broadcom, Cisco, Comcast, HP, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Kenwood, LG, Macrovision, Microsoft, Motorola, Nokia, NXP, Panasonic, Philips, Pioneer, Samsung, Sharp, Sony and Toshiba. Additional information about the alliance, its participating companies and membership benefits is available at www.dlna.org.

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DLNA EXPANDS CERTIFICATION PROGRAM TO INCLUDE “PLAY TO” AND “PRINT TO” FUNCTIONALITY

DLNA Booth Location at CES 2009: CP3 in the Silver lot of the Central Plaza

DLNA has added two new functions to its certification program. The expanded program includes “Play to” and “Print to” capabilities that allow connected devices to push photos, videos and audio from one device on a home network to another DLNA Certified device.

“Play to” and “Print to” functions let users send content to a rendering device such as a digital photo frame, TV or printer. This extends the traditional concept of players and servers to add a third device, digital media controller. Digital media controllers are useful for sending photos, video and audio to display devices which have inaccessible or no integrated controls. An example is a mobile handheld device or PC pushing content from a networked attached storage (NAS) server to a networked digital photo frame in another room using “Play to” functionality. “Print to” products let users send photos from a remote server to a printer.

DLNA expects to certify the first “Play to” and “Print to” products in the first quarter of 2009.

Products which successfully complete the DLNA Certification & Logo program are granted use of the “DLNA CERTIFIED” logo. This signifies to consumers that the product has been tested with the reference devices and the DLNA developed Conformance Test Tool (CTT) as well as meets DLNA Interoperability Guidelines. More than 3,100 products have been certified by DLNA since the inception of the certification program in 2005.

“DLNA product certification continues to gain momentum with vendors worldwide,” says Scott Smyers, chairman of the DLNA board of directors and senior vice president of Sony. “Today’s announcement is another example of how we are continuing to expand our Certification programs to address the applications most important to consumers’ digital living experience.”

“The connected home product category is driven by DLNA,” says Kurt Scherf, vice president and principal analyst of Parks Associates. “Expansions to the DLNA Certification program announced today add even more value to the home networking marketplace, by ensuring devices have been thoroughly tested in accordance with the DLNA Interoperability Guidelines, and adhere to a robust set of widely accepted industry standards.”

About DLNA
Members of Digital Living Network Alliance (DLNA) share a vision of an interoperable network of personal computers (PC), consumer electronics (CE), mobile devices and service providers in and beyond the home, enabling a seamless environment for sharing and growing new digital media and content services. Founded in 2003, the group established and maintains a platform of interoperability based on open and established industry standards that, when used by manufacturers will support the sharing of media through wired or wireless networks. More than 240 multi-industry companies from around the world have joined DLNA, committing the time and resources necessary to achieve their vision. DLNA’s 2009 Promoter Members include: Access, Awox, Broadcom, Cisco, Comcast, HP, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Kenwood, LG, Macrovision, Microsoft, Motorola, Nokia, NXP, Panasonic, Philips, Pioneer, Samsung, Sharp, Sony and Toshiba. Additional information about the alliance, its participating companies and membership benefits is available at www.dlna.org.




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  • http://www.davisfreeberg.com Davis Freeberg

    DLNA is an utter joke. I’d almost avoid buying products that signed off on the certification scheme. Consumers should be the ones driving technology not the dinosaur media companies who’ve done everything they could to slow it down. I think that when all is said and done, DLNA will be so completely neutered by content restrictions that it will actually hurt sales of the devices that sign off on the certification scheme.

  • Steve

    The above comment and it’s attitude are systematic of what happens every time “standards” are attempted, implemented or agreed. What needs to be understood is that if DLNA is not the answer; something similar is actually needed by the consumer.

    Some imparted a similar attitude when Windows, IOS and Ethernet first started. Where would we be today, when 99%+ of end users use these systems? Not necessarily, the best solutions available (given) but they have and are evolving all the time to meet the need of the masses! This is progress on a massive scale!

  • http://www.ehomeupgrade.com Alexander Grundner

    Davis have a look at the latest “Play To” feature in Windows 7 and see how it leverages DLNA to do some incredible things with connected devices around the home.
    http://www.ehomeupgrade.com/2009/01/23/must-see-windows-7-play-to-in-action/

    FYI, DLNA products will play any type of file they’re designed to playback — be it ripped files in supported formats, audio / video / photo files, or DRM files streamed in from online providers (a relatively new feature that requires key sharing and other technologies).

    Think of DLNA as an umbrella certification that ensures that certain industry/interoperability standard technologies are in place in a device to make them compatible with various cross-platform media server application platforms.

  • http://www.ehomeupgrade.com/2009/01/23/must-see-windows-7-play-to-in-action/ Must See: Windows 7 “Play To” in Action | eHomeUpgrade

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